Tower!3D Pro Manual

WELCOME TO TOWER!3D PRO

In Tower!3D Pro your assignment is to guide aircraft of various sizes and capabilities to and from the active runway for landing and takeoff. As Tower Controller you must assure that it safe for a plane to enter or cross a runway, assign taxiway routes, when to stop and start movement, and clear aircraft for take off. Tower!3D Pro provides you with flight strips, ground and air radar screens and a full 3D view of the airport. Tower!3D Pro is no arcade game. With a complex command structure, advanced AI and Speech Recognition technology Tower!3D Pro will allow you to experience of the thrill of being a real air traffic controller.

 

THE THEORY BEHIND AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL

As the Tower Controller your task is to provide safe passage to all aircraft within your control space. This is accomplished through issuing commands to your charges that assure adequate aircraft separation both in-air and on-ground.


Tower!3D Pro by feelThere is programmed to follow, more or less, United States of America Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and European (EUROCONTROL) guidelines for traffic control.  While the command structure simulation is not completely accurate to “real world” procedures, instructions sent to aircraft are designed to apply to a broad set of applicable global procedures.


Tower!3D Pro by feelThere is programmed so that all aircraft fly IFR and all airports have ground radar capability.  As such, all aircraft maintain a radio for two-way communication and carry equipment to correctly report their position on the tower radars when on ground and when airborne:  altitude and airspeed.
When in single-player mode Tower  places you simultaneously in two controller positions: Tower and Ground Controller.  Multiplayer mode allows you to define whom is the Ground and Tower controller.
Air traffic control towers are operated for the purpose of providing separation to aircraft using the airport.  The primary responsibility of the tower controller is to ensure sufficient runway separation exists between landing and departing aircraft.  Other responsibilities include relaying Instrument Flight Rule (IFR) clearances, providing taxi instructions and directing airborne aircraft within the vicinity of the airport.


The Ground Controller is responsible for the safety of aircraft that are taxiing on taxiways or inactive runways.  To ensure the ground controller is always communicating with the correct pilot, the aircraft’s position must be positively determined before issuing instructions.  This may be done through the use of visual observation, a pilot report or ground radar.  Once this determination has been made, communication should include the aircraft identification, the route to be used while taxiing and any restrictions applicable to the pilot.

Controlling Departures Telling aircraft it is OK to takeoff as soon as they arrive at the runway isn’t all there is to being a controller.  Your role is to assure adequate aircraft separation, and provide a reasonable and safe flow of traffic away from the airport to avoid conflicts with arriving aircraft.  This is done by properly spacing inbound aircraft (discussed later) AND sequencing departures into the traffic flow.


Aircraft separation is generally defined by the phase of flight the aircraft is currently in (takeoff, climb, cruise, descent, and landing) and the size of the aircraft.  Aircraft are categorized according to weight:
• Cat I = under 41,000 pounds gross weight (small)
• Cat II = between 41,000 and 255,000 pounds gross weight (large)
• Cat III = over 255,000 pounds gross weight (heavy)

 

INSTALLING TOWER!3D PRO

Supported Operating Systems:

  • Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bits

  • Windows 8 64 bits

  • Windows 10 64 bits

Minimum Computer Specifications:

  • 1.2 GHz processor

  • 1 GB RAM

  • Graphics: 256 MB

  • Storage: 700 MB available space

  • External mouse

  • Minimum resolution: 1280x720

  • For voice recognition a English (US) setting is required

  • For speech a native Windows English (US) voice must be installed

 

USING VOICE RECOGNITION

Before using the voice recognition abilities of Tower!3D Pro by feelThere, you must 'train' your computer to recognize your voice.  The voice recognition profile must be set to English US. Details on how to configure and train the Speech API are available from Microsoft.

IMPORTANT:

  • Tower!3D Pro only recognizes typed or spoken English, the international language of air traffic control.

  • Tower!3D Pro only recognizes voice commands when Speech is set to English US.  If you have setup Speech under English UK you must retrain your computer.  For those that already have already trained their computer for 'English UK' create a new Speech 'User profile' so your UK settings are not lost.

  • The LEFT SHIFT must be pushed and held when speaking commands.  When you have completed a command release the  button.

  • The use of Speech is not required.  Tower!3D Pro can be played by mouse commands as most commands are available as buttons on the control panel..

  • A high quality microphone improves Speech's ability to interpret your voice.

  • Speak at a steady pace without to short a pause between words and numbers. Speaking too quickly or with long pauses will confuse Speech.

  • Keeping background noises to a minimum improves Speech's ability to interpret your voice.

Because of differences between individual's speech diction and limitations with Microsoft's Speech API feelThere does not guarantee that voice recognition will work flawlessly for all users.

For Tower to 'listen' to your voiced commands the LEFT SHIFT must be pressed and held using the left-mouse-button.  
Commands must be stated as outlined in the Commands section of this manual.  The commands listed are the only word sequencing that Tower!3D Pro will recognize.
When speaking commands Tower will display the command the voice recognition believes you are stating in the Command screen window. The entire command phrase must be stated for the instruction to be accepted by   Tower!3D Pro. As the software recognizes each word/letter/number the text will change from shadow to bold printing.
If Tower does not recognize your instruction and clears the Command screen line, it is best to release the LEFT SHIFT button before speaking again.

Taxiways and general aviation callsigns are identified using these ICAO phonic pronunciation codes; 

Letter - Code

  • A - Alfa

  • B - Bravo

  • C - Charlie

  • D - Delta

  • E - Echo

  • F - Foxtrot

  • G - Golf

  • H - Hotel

  • I - India

  • J - Juliett

  • K - Kilo

  • L - Lima

  • M - Mike

  • N - November

  • O - Oscar

  • P - Papa

  • Q - Quebec

  • R - Romeo

  • S - Sierra

  • T - Tango

  • U - Uniform

  • V - Victor

  • W - Whiskey

  • X - X-ray

  • Y - Yankee

  • Z - Zulu

Numbers used in callsigns, taxiways and runways are identified using these ICAO phonic pronunciation codes 

  • 0 - Zero

  • 1 - One

  • 2 - Two

  • 3 - Three

  • 4 - Four

  • 5 - Five

  • 6 - Six

  • 7 - Seven

  • 8 - Eight

  • 9 - Niner
     

AIRLINE CALLSIGNS

TAB, LESLIE, Trans American, United States
FRT, FIELD AIR, Feelthere International Airlines, United States
TGB, GLOBE, Trans Global, Europe
VAL, VALUE, Value, United States
BLA,  LAKES, Big Lakes, United States
CBA, CHESHIRE, Cheshire Blue, Europe
BTV, WHITE SAND, Be There Vacation, Europe
DEN, DENALI, Denali Airlines, United States
RAA, RAINIER, Rainier Air, EUROPE
ANG, GOLDSUN, Gold Sun Air, Asia
LAW, LATITUDE, Latitude Airways, Europe
UAX, OZZY, Uluru, Australia
EMF, PACKAGE, Express Mail Freight, Europe
PAV, PATIENCE, Silent Valley Airline, Asia
MAX, MAGIC, Magic Express, USA

If your voice is not recognized by the computer please visit our post here: http://forum.simflight.com/topic/83886-speech-issue/

 
 

CONTROLLING BASICS

We’ll now take a close look at how all of the smaller details of Tower!3D works.

 

Mouse commands

On all screen scroll wheel is zoom. On the 3D window you can pan (unless a plane is selected) by the middle drag mouse button. On the radars you can move radar position by left drag and rotate the airplane's datatag by the right drag.

Controlling Departures

 

Telling aircraft it is OK to takeoff as soon as they arrive at the runway isn’t all there is to being a controller.  Your role is to assure adequate aircraft separation, and provide a reasonable and safe flow of traffic away from the airport to avoid conflicts with arriving aircraft.  This is done by properly spacing inbound aircraft (discussed later) AND sequencing departures into the traffic flow.


Aircraft separation is generally defined by the phase of flight the aircraft is currently in (takeoff, climb, cruise, descent, and landing) and the size of the aircraft.  Aircraft are categorized according to weight:

• Cat I = under 41,000 pounds gross weight (small)

• Cat II = between 41,000 and 255,000 pounds gross weight (large)

• Cat III = over 255,000 pounds gross weight (heavy)

As you are the Tower controller you are responsible for assuring safe separation distances.  As such you must know the category of each aircraft is assigned.  With this knowledge the distance between takeoffs can be figured.


Prior to giving the clearance to takeoff you must satisfy the following aircraft category criteria:

• When the aircraft wanting to takeoff is CAT I and the aircraft taking off prior is CAT I the departing aircraft is past the departure end of the runway; OR the prior aircraft has left the runway surface and is at least 3000’ ahead of the aircraft wishing to take-off.

• When the aircraft wanting to takeoff is CAT I and the aircraft taking off prior is CAT II the prior aircraft has left the runway surface and is at least 3000’ ahead of the aircraft wishing to take-off.

• When the aircraft wanting to takeoff is CAT II and the aircraft taking off prior is CAT I or CAT II the prior aircraft has left the runway surface and is at least 4500’ ahead of the aircraft wishing to take-off.

• When the aircraft wanting to takeoff is CAT III and the aircraft taking off prior is CAT I or CAT II the prior aircraft has left the runway surface and is at least 6000’ ahead of the aircraft wishing to take-off.

 

When reviewing an aircraft's size you must also keep in mind the plane's in-flight performance.  A heavy, CAT III, aircraft doesn't have much concern with the wake turbulence created by a small CAT I propeller plane (it is best to avoided all wake turbulence), but the climb rate and airspeed are both items to consider.  Once airplanes are away from the runway the flights under your control came must have 5 miles horizontal separation and their vertical separation must be greater than 1000 feet.  Be aware of each plane's performance abilities as you are responsible for clearing planes and assigning flight headings to avoid in-air conflicts.


You cannot allow an aircraft to take-off until landing aircraft are clear of the runway.


You must also keep the following in mind when controlling airports with parallel runways:

• simultaneous takeoffs are only allowed if the runways are separated by more than 2500’.

• parallel runways less the 2500' apart require the aircraft to be separated by one mile and flying a diverging course greater than fifteen degrees.


If a landing aircraft is told to GO AROUND, while another is taking off from the same runway, the departing aircraft must instructed to fly a course that diverges the lead plane's heading by more than 30 degrees.


Adding to the fun, if you are controlling an airport with runways that intersect another active runway or taxiway, the controller must ensure the pilot does not begin the takeoff roll until at least one of the following conditions exist:

• A preceding landing aircraft has

◦ taxied off the landing runway

◦ completed the landing roll
◦ passed the intersection

• A preceding departing aircraft is airborne and has passed the intersection, or is turning prior to the intersection to avoid a conflict.
 

You are also allowed to use anticipated separation.  Where you are reasonably assured that correct separation will exist air traffic controllers are permitted to issue both anticipated takeoff and landing clearances.


Normal practice is to transfer control to departure as soon as possible to reduce workload.  It is your responsibility not to clear the next aircraft for takeoff until the departing aircraft is safely away.  Once you are certain the flight is clear, you can instruct the pilot to contact Departure.


When leaving your control the AI pilot will acknowledge the command by saying, “Good bye;” and the aircraft’s data block on the radar screen is cleared with only a  “T” remaining.  Planes without a data block are not under your control.  At the same time the data block clears from the radar screen the strip for the departing flight will clear from the Strip screen.


To send a command to a plane you need to use the Command Panel (more about the CP below)

The information just covered is a primer of the many types of commands you may use when controlling in Tower!3D Pro.  As your basic control skills improve you are encouraged to read the real world resources about air traffic control and incorporate these in your controlling.  A short list of real-world resources are listed in the Real World Air Traffic Control Resources section of this manual.


Controlling Arrivals
 

Tower!3D's AI TRACON controller will direct the aircraft to final approach (you will not see or hear these commands).  You cannot control arriving aircraft until the pilot contacts you stating, “With you.” Even if you see her strip on your board, or see his radar return on your radar screen you must wait until the pilot calls for your control.  Only after being contacted by arriving aircraft can you grant the aircraft clearance to land; change the runway assignment, or direct the pilot appropriately to avoid collisions or “near misses”.


Approach control is responsible for instructing aircraft to keep adequate aircraft separation; and providing a reasonable and safe flow of the airport’s landing traffic that avoids departing and arriving traffic.  Your role is to assure that it is safe for aircraft to land.  There is a Golden Rule: No aircraft may land when another aircraft is on the runway.


As with departure control you can enter control information into the Command Panel


You are allowed to use anticipated separation.  Where you are reasonably assured that correct separation will exist air traffic controllers are permitted to issue both anticipated arrival and departure clearances.


As aircraft approach their landing runway keep in mind the plane's in-flight performance.  A heavy, CAT III, jet doesn't have much concern with the wake turbulence created by a small, CAT I, propeller plane, but the slower airspeed of the propeller driven plane is something to consider.  Be aware of each plane's performance abilities as you are responsible for assuring that aircraft keep safe separation distances.  In the case of a heavy, CAT III, following a small, CAT I, you  may need to issue GO AROUND command to keep a faster aircraft from overtaking a slower plane.


The information just covered is a primer of the many types of commands you may use when controlling in Tower! 2011.  As your basic control skills improve you are encouraged to read the real world resources about air traffic control and incorporate these in your game controlling.  A short list of real-world resources are listed in the Real World Air Traffic Control Resources section of this manual.


Controlling Ground Traffic
 

One of the primary responsibilities of the ground controller is to prevent a runway incursion.  If an aircraft must cross or enter an active runway, the ground controller must first give permission for the pilot to do so.  In similar fashion, pilots must not be permitted to cross/enter taxiways when doing so could interfere with traffic already on the taxiway.  You responsibility is to use “HOLD POSITION” commands to keep aircraft off of the active runways and to keep planes from getting into situations where there can be a collision.


All aircraft that display on the ADIRS Ground Radar screen are under your control.  These aircraft also have a strip on the Strip screen.  You cannot issue taxi commands to aircraft that are not under your control.


Gate and parking locations are not under your control.  By selecting a landing plane assigned terminal highlighted by light blue on the ADIRS screen.  A green aircraft icon will appear at the flight's assigned gate once you issue the  "TAXI TO GATE" command. Tower!3D does not require you to issue specific taxiway instruction to arriving flights.  When you do not assign a taxi route the AI pilot will select the most direct route between the plane's current location and the parking location.


AI pilots will choose a route on their own that avoids conflicts or collisions.  It is recommended that you assign specific taxi routing by right clicking on taxiways prior sending the "TAXI TO TERMINAL" command to avoid collisions between aircraft.  When setting taxi routes be aware that AI pilots will not stop their taxi to avoid a collision or conflict.  The only situation where an AI pilot will stop to avoid a collision is when following another plane, or if there is about to be a head-on collision.  With experience you can create taxi routing that avoid conflicts between aircraft going to their parking location and those heading for their assigned runway.


The information just covered is a primer of the many types of commands you may use when controlling in Tower!3D Pro.  As your basic control skills improve you are encouraged to read the real world resources about air traffic control and incorporate these in your game controlling.  A short list of real-world resources are listed in the Real World Air Traffic Control Resources section of this manual.


Things to Remember When Controlling


• You cannot control aircraft movement until the pilot has contacted you.  Aircraft approaching the airport will call, “with you;” aircraft on-ground will call, “ready to taxi.”

• You, as controller, will be responsible for determining the arrival/departure patterns to be used. There is a wealth of charts available on the web to assist you in this regard.

• In Tower!3D you are controlling ground operations, landings and takeoffs.  You are not responsible directing aircraft through airport SID and STAR procedures.  Tower will control aircraft until they are on final approach.  After aircraft takeoff you to transfer control to departure so Tower can direct the pilots away from the airport’s airspace.

• Please remember this is a game, and as such not meant to duplicate actual procedures in the airport towers around the world!  It is not meant as a training vehicle for aspiring controllers.

• Practice, practice, practice!  Controllers do not develop overnight, nor should you expect your skills to do so.  Start small and slow, and as you gain confidence and an understanding of appropriate traffic flow, move to the more challenging scenarios.  The syntax used in “Real World” controlling is very specific and standardized for a reason.  Before long, you will be issuing commands without hesitation.

• If you give yourself the opportunity, this simulation will become one of the most anxiety inducing, hair raising and perspiration inspiring “games” that you have ever enjoyed!
 

THE COMMAND PANEL

 

This panel is the "heart" of Tower!3D. This is where you issue all the commands. Let's see the basics:

1) Pause button. You can pause the simulation at any times and clicking it again continue the game.
2) History button. By clicking on it a subpanel opens where you can scroll through the previously assigned and replied commands.
3) Action camera button. By clicking on it Tower!3D will direct the view for you showing close ups of aircraft actions.
4) Accelerator. You can select the game's speed. 
5) Turns ON and OFF the airport's lights
6) Turns the ADIRS ON and OFF
7) Turns the DBRITE On and OFF
8) Turns the STRIP On and OFF
9) Asks the last airplane to repeat the command

10) Help button. Opens this website.
11) Local time. It can differ from the one you selected at the game's start making sure it avoids periods without traffic..
12) Score. This is where you can see the current session's score.
13) Displays the wind's direction and speed.

 

SEND: you need to push this button to send out the message (except in voice recognition mode where simply releasing the LEFT SHIFT sends out the command)

The Command Panel also displays the available runways for the airport. By checking them green will make the runway "active" allowing the AI Tracon controller to land airplanes on the selected runway. This way you can change active runways even during gameplay. Please note it takes some time for the AI controller to assign the new runway to the arrival planes. Any airplane already sequenced for a certain runway will not be changed by Tracon, it's your job to either vector to the new runway or send them back to Tracon for re-sequencing.


CLEAR
Clears the current command and airplane. This is when you can freely rotate the camera in the 3D view.

DELETE AIRPLANE
Deletes any selected airplane. Use this command only in situation when an airplane struck and there is no other way out.

SEND
Use this button to activate any commands. 

Departure

 

This is the Command Panel (CP) status of a departing airplane at the gate. Bold lettering will explain how to assign the given command using voice recognition. 


RUNWAY SELECTION
This is where the active landing runway can be selected during game. In multiplayer mode only Tower can change it.

PUSHBACK
Opens a sub-panel where you need to select the expected runway. It will determinate the direction where the airplane will be pushed back.

CALLSIGN,  PUSHBACK APPROVED, EXPECT RUNWAY XX

RUNWAY
Opens a new sub-panel where you can select the departing runway. You can either select the runways from here or right click anywhere on the runway (on the Ground Radar) selecting an intersection for the takeoff. Once you selected a runway you can also right click on taxiway (on the Ground Radar) to assign specific taxi route to the takeoff runway (VIA). Once you are happy with the command hit the SEND button.

CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX
CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX TAXI VIA TAXIWAY X ( Z, Y) (multiple taxiways can be assigned to generate a complex routing)
CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX AT TAXIWAY X (if you assign an intersection instead of a runway ending for takeoff)
CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX AT TAXIWAY X VIA TAXIWAY X (multiple taxiways can be assigned to generate a complex routing)


CLEARED FOR
Cleared for takeoff. Add this command only when you are sure a safe takeoff is possible.

 

CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF
CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF UPON REACHING ALTITUDE XXX THOUSAND (XX HUNDRED) CONTACT DEPARTURE
CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX CLIMB TO XXX THOUSAND (XX HUNDRED) ON REACHING CONTACT DEPARTURE CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF
CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX CLIMB TO XXX THOUSAND (XX HUNDRED) ON REACHING TURN LEFT/RIGHT HEADING XXX CONTACT DEPARTURE CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF
CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX CLIMB TO XXX THOUSAND (XX HUNDRED) ON REACHING TURN LEFT/RIGHT HEADING XXX CONTACT DEPARTURE CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF
CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX CLIMB VIA RUNWAY HEADING TO XXX THOUSAND (XX HUNDRED) ON REACHING TURN LEFT/RIGHT TO HEADING XXX; CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF
CALLSIGN, AFTER DEPARTURE FLY HEADING XXX; RUNWAY XX CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF
CALLSIGN, AFTER DEPARTURE TURN LEFT/RIGHT XX DEGREES RUNWAY XX CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF
CALLSIGN, LEFT/RIGHT CLOSED TRAFFIC APPROVED RUNWAY XX CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF
(for local traffic only)
CALLSIGN, WIND IS XXX (direction in degrees) AT XX KNOTS RUNWAY XX CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF 

LINE UP AND WAIT
You can direct an airplane to the runway without allowing it to start the takeoff roll.

CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX LINE UP AND WAIT
CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX LINE UP AND WAIT BEHIND NEXT LANDING AIRCRAFT


CONTINUE TAXI
If you instruct an airplane to hold it's position or the airplane stops before crossing a runway you need to use this continue to give a continue taxi instruction.

CALLSIGN, CONTINUE TAXI


HOLD POSITION
You can instruct the airplane to stop right away. Please note a jet will take a while to stop.

 

CALLSIGN HOLD POSITION​

FOLLOW COMPANY
If you wish any airplane to taxi to the same position and on the same routing as it's company, use this command. Note: if there are multiple airplanes within the same company it will pick the closest's routing.

CALLSIGN, FOLLOW COMPANY

Some commands are available only as spoken commands only:

CALLSIGN, HOLD SHORT OF RUNWAY 
CALLSIGN, HOLD SHORT OF TAXIWAY 
(TAXIWAY Z, TAXIWAY Y)

Once the airplane is airborne the commands on the CP change to the airborne commands

CONTACT DEPARTURE
Once you send an airplane to departure you delegate all responsibility to the AI departure controller. This is where job ends for this certain flight.

 

CALLSIGN, CONTACT DEPARTURE

TURN
By clicking it opens a sub window. You can instruct the airplane to turn left or right or to a certain heading. Sometimes it requires to separate two departing airplanes.

 

CALLSIGN, TURN LEFT HEADING XXX
CALLSIGN, TURN RIGHT HEADING XXX
CALLSIGN, TURN LEFT XX DEGREES
CALLSIGN, TURN RIGHT XX DEGREES

REPORT
You can ask the pilot information about it's speed, position and heading.

CALLSIGN, REPORT HEADING
CALLSIGN, REPORT POSITION
CALLSIGN, REPORT AIRSPEED

ARRIVALS

 

This is the Command Panel (CP) status of an arrival airplane. Bold lettering will explain how to assign the given command using voice recognition. 


RUNWAY SELECTION
This is where the active landing runway can be selected during game. In multiplayer mode only Tower can change it.

CLEARED TO
Cleared to land. 

CALLSIGN,  RUNWAY XX CLEARED TO LAND

There are other cleared to land commands available as spoken commands only

 

CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX CLEARED TO LAND HOLD SHORT OF TAXIWAY XXXX FOR CROSSING TRAFFIC (the airplane will try to stop before the named taxiway)

CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX CLEARED TO LAND HOLD SHORT OF RUNWAY XX FOR CROSSING TRAFFIC (the airplane will try to stop before the named runway)

 

You can also issue the following verbal commands too during the approach phase:


CALLSIGN, EXIT AT TAXIWAY XXXX (the airplane will try to exit at the named taxiway)
CALLSIGN, VACATE RUNWAY LEFT ONTO TAXIWAY XXXX (the airplane will try to exit at the named taxiway towards the requested direction)
CALLSIGN, VACATE RUNWAY RIGHT ONTO TAXIWAY XXXX (the airplane will try to exit at the named taxiway towards the requested direction)

CLEARED FOR
Cleared for low approach. The airplane will fly over the runway without landing on it. You need to handle it by either sending to departure or controlling back to the final of any of the runway. The typical use is for local, training traffic.


CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XXX CLEARED FOR LOW APPROACH

There are other, verbal only, commands available for local traffic

CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX CLEARED TO TOUCH AND GO (the airplane will land but immediately climb back again)
CALLSIGN, RUNWAY XX CLEARED FOR STOP AND GO (the airplane will land and stop on the runway and without further permission will take off again)

CALLSIGN, EXTEND DOWNWIND XX MILES (the plane will extend the downwind by the requested distance)
CALLSIGN, EXTEND UPWIND XX MILES (the plane will extend the upwind by the requested distance)
CALLSIGN, EXTEND DOWNWIND X MILE (the plane will extend the downwind by the requested distance)
CALLSIGN, EXTEND UPWIND X MILE (the plane will extend the upwind by the requested distance)
CALLSIGN, ENTER LEFT PATTERN RUNWAY XX (the plane will enter the left pattern of the requested runway)
CALLSIGN, ENTER RIGHT PATTERN RUNWAY XX (the plane will enter the right pattern of the requested runway)

 

GO AROUND
The plane will abort it's approach to the runway and will climb back to a certain altitude maintaining the runway heading. It's your job to either send it to departure for re-sequencing or you can vector it back to any of the runways.

 

CALLSIGN, GO AROUND

ENTER FINAL
This command will make the plane to find it's own way to the the given runway's final and will begin it's landing to that runway

CALLSIGN, ENTER FINAL RUNWAY XX

There is another verbal only command that will ask the plane to switch to the other parallel runway during approach.

CALLSIGN, CHANGE TO RUNWAY XX

TURN
By clicking it opens a sub window. You can instruct the airplane to turn left or right or to a certain heading. Sometimes it requires to separate two departing airplanes.

 

CALLSIGN, TURN LEFT HEADING XXX
CALLSIGN, TURN RIGHT HEADING XXX
CALLSIGN, TURN LEFT XX DEGREES
CALLSIGN, TURN RIGHT XX DEGREES

REPORT
You can ask the pilot information about it's speed, position and heading.

CALLSIGN, REPORT HEADING
CALLSIGN, REPORT POSITION
CALLSIGN, REPORT AIRSPEED

TAKE NEXT

CALLSIGN, TAKE NEXT AVAILABLE EXIT ON LEFT (the airplane will try to exit in the first available exit in the requested direction)
CALLSIGN, TAKE NEXT AVAILABLE EXIT ON RIGHT (the airplane will try to exit in the first available exit in the requested direction)

CONTACT

CALLSIGN, CONTACT GROUND (for multiplayer sessions)
CALLSIGN, CONTACT TOWER (for multiplayer sessions)

Once the airplane lands the commands on the CP change to ground commands
 

TAXI TO
There is no difference between these commands from the coding point of view.
 

CALLSIGN, TAXI TO TERMINAL
CALLSIGN, TAXI TO RAMP
CALLSIGN, TAXI TO APRON

There are also verbal only variations of these commands:

CALLSIGN, TAXI TO TERMINAL VIA ;#taxiway1;#taxiway2;#taxiway3;#taxiway4;#taxiway5;#taxiway6 (for the taxiways all you have to spee out their name such as alpha, mike, oscar, etc...)
CALLSIGN, TAXI TO RAMP VIA ;#taxiway1;#taxiway2;#taxiway3;#taxiway4;#taxiway5;#taxiway6
CALLSIGN, TAXI TO APRON VIA ;#taxiway1;#taxiway2;#taxiway3;#taxiway4;#taxiway5;#taxiway6

 

CONTINUE TAXI
If you instruct an airplane to hold it's position or the airplane stops before crossing a runway you need to use this continue to give a continue taxi instruction.

CALLSIGN, CONTINUE TAXI


HOLD POSITION
You can instruct the airplane to stop right away. Please note a jet will take a while to stop.

 

CALLSIGN HOLD POSITION

MULTIPLAYER

SETUP

Host computer configuration
• First configure your Internet connection device to allow communication through port 21112 (see Router, Modem and/or Internet connection device configuration below for details).
• Select the airport, active runways, time and weather conditions on the Tower/Select simulation page.  Be sure to share these conditions with the player joining the controlling session.
• Provide the hosting computer's IP address to the client player.  If your ISP and/or router dynamically assigns an IP address you will need to confirm the address before each multiplayer session.  An Internet search for 'MY IP' will list on-line resources for identifying your home/office IP address.
• After sharing your IP address with your client, press the Start server button on the Tower/Select simulation page to open Tower's Internet connection.
• Allow Tower!3D PRO to connect to the Internet if your firewall displays a security warning.


Client computer configuration
• Enter the host computer's address into the IP address window on the Tower/Select simulation page.
• Press the Join button to connect to the host computer.
• Allow Tower!3D PRO to connect to the Internet if your firewall displays a security warning.

 

Router, Modem, and/or Internet connection device configuration 
You must instruct your router, modem and/or Internet connection device(s) permission for Tower!3D PRO to host a multiplayer session.  In your Internet connection device(s) configuration utility and create a custom service:
• Go to port forwarding/triggering select port forwarding.
• Select TCP/UDP and create a name, such as TOWER
• Set starting and ending ports as 21112.
• Set the host computer's IP address (if the IP address is set dynamically each time you turn on your computer you will need to check the IP address each time you create a multiplayer session).
• Save the custom service.

 

NOTE: the above instructions are generic.  You will need to review your Internet connection device(s) owner's manual for the specific sequence of steps to configure a custom service.
 

 

CREDITS AND COPYRIGHTS:

Developed by:.................................................................feelThere – www.feelthere.com

Producer:................................................................................Victor Racz

Programing:...........................................................................Marton Szucs

Aerial Airport Imagery:.........................................................Data available from U.S. Geological Survey, EROS Data Center, Sioux Falls, SD.


Published by:..........................................................................feelThere - www.feelthere.com

All trademarks and brand names are trademarks or registered trademarks of the respective owners. feelThere associated logos are registered trademarks.

The use of this product is restricted to the private domain and for entertainment purposes only.. Usage of this product for any professional or commercial activity is strictly forbidden. For professional use of the product contact feelThere, Inc. at sales@feelthere.com

 

The code used in feelThere's products may under no circumstances be decompiled or used for any other purposes without the expressed written permission of feelThere, Inc.

 

Additional responsibilities, restrictions and copyrights are outlined in the End User License Agreement (EULA) provided when the software is installed.

JSON PARSER:

/*

* File JSON.cpp part of the SimpleJSON Library - http://mjpa.in/json

*

* Copyright (C) 2010 Mike Anchor

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* THE SOFTWARE.

*/